Hope-Moore Education

RSS

What Is An Academic Coach?

An Academic Coach will help you prepare for exams and assignments, in addition to, helping you manage your time more effectively, get organized, and develop an academic success plan. Academic Coaches are ideal for any student, regardless of age, and they are great for students needing to conquer procrastination.

Question: What is the difference between an Academic Coach and a tutor?

A tutor usually focuses on a a particular subject and helps with gaining a better understanding of a concept, assignment, skill, etc… An Academic Coach develops a holistic plan that will make you successful as a learner. The Academic Coach will focus on strengthening your skills as a learner. This means improving your organization, time-management, studying, and writing skills. 

At Hope-Moore Education, we can be your Academic Coach and help you reach your academic goals. 

idonethis:

image
Image: Bill Sodeman/Thomas Hawk

Hey, you’re pretty awesome yourself.  Go ahead and do great things!

This is the attitude I want each of my clients to have. Stop listening to what society has defined you as. You have within you the ability to achieve greatness and accomplish your heart’s desires. Now, let’s get started together! 

world-shaker:

30 Incredible Ways Technology Will Change Education By 2028
An interesting read, and a definite conversation starter. Here are their five year predictions (2018):

Technology to promote early literacy habits is seeded by venture capitalists. This is the start of new government programs that start farming out literacy and educational programs to start-ups, entrepreneurs, app developers, and other private sector innovators.
Digital literacy begins to outpace academic literacy in some fringe classrooms.
Custom multimedia content is available as the private sectors create custom iTunesU courses, YouTube channels, and other holding areas for content that accurately responds to learner needs.
Improved tools for measuring text complexity emerge, available through the camera feature of a mobile device, among other possibilities.
Open Source learning models will grow faster than those closed, serving as a hotbed for innovation in learning.
Purely academic standards, such as the Common Core movement in the United States, will begin to decline. As educators seek curriculum based not on content, but on the ability to interact, self-direct, and learn, institutionally-centered artifacts of old-age academia will begin to lost credibility.
Visual data will replace numerical data as schools struggle to communicate learning results to disenfranchised family and community members.

world-shaker:

30 Incredible Ways Technology Will Change Education By 2028

An interesting read, and a definite conversation starter. Here are their five year predictions (2018):

Technology to promote early literacy habits is seeded by venture capitalists. This is the start of new government programs that start farming out literacy and educational programs to start-ups, entrepreneurs, app developers, and other private sector innovators.

Digital literacy begins to outpace academic literacy in some fringe classrooms.

Custom multimedia content is available as the private sectors create custom iTunesU courses, YouTube channels, and other holding areas for content that accurately responds to learner needs.

Improved tools for measuring text complexity emerge, available through the camera feature of a mobile device, among other possibilities.

Open Source learning models will grow faster than those closed, serving as a hotbed for innovation in learning.

Purely academic standards, such as the Common Core movement in the United States, will begin to decline. As educators seek curriculum based not on content, but on the ability to interact, self-direct, and learn, institutionally-centered artifacts of old-age academia will begin to lost credibility.

Visual data will replace numerical data as schools struggle to communicate learning results to disenfranchised family and community members.

Triennials

Well, I had my son’s Triennial Assessment meeting today. I was, for the most part, satisfied with the results from the IEP team. My son, a 14-year-old on the spectrum, has anxiety issues, behaviors, and issues with all transitions. I was excited to request the TTAP (see previous blog) for him and see what types of vocations may suit him and his strengths. However, I learned today that the TTAP requires the test subject to transition through a series of items and with that nugget of information my hopes went down the drain. HOWEVER, my son’s wonderful Occupation Therapist decided to give him the Jacob’s Prevocational Skills Assessment (JPSA). YEAH! All was not lost after all. The JPSA can be modified for those students with communication needs. The purpose of JPSA is to assess work behaviors, skills, and physical capacities of adolescents with disabilities. So, for those of us with children with communication needs, transition needs, and/or behaviors, the JPSA is a great option. 

Enough about my Triennial meeting today…my suggestion for triennials is to find out which assessments are going to be given to your child and request additional assessments that may benefit your child. During the Triennial meeting, please ask questions about anything you need further clarification on. Everyday language should be used in the Assessment Reports. Bottom line: These Assessment Reports should be a snapshot of your child’s strengths and deficits. Your child’s IEP team will use these results to develop new IEP goals and/or modify the current IEP goals. Please do not allow the team to use the same IEP goals year after year. That’s a no-no! 

We are on Facebook, too!

Join the discussion today. We want to hear from you. Please share any and everything regarding education, special education, disabilities, etc…

https://www.facebook.com/HopeMooreEducation

Follow us on Twitter, please.

https://twitter.com/HopeMooreEdu

IDD (IEP Development Days)

Well, it’s that time of the year again, IEP Development Days (IDD). IEPs are being reviewed for modification by the IEP team and parents are preparing themselves for the long meeting. HOWEVER, it does not have to be a chore for parents. Start thinking about your child’s strengths/deficits. What areas have you seen improvement in at home? Is your child involved with community activities? Share the successes from these activities with your child’s IEP team. If possible, bring someone who knows your child outside of school to the IEP. The IEP team needs a holistic view of your child. 

More than anything, please make sure your child’s IEP represents your child’s abilities and the supports are in place to ensure their success in the classroom. This means asking for the proper assessments and incorporating those results into the IEP. For example, if you feel your child may benefit from an one-on-one aide, request a SCIA (Special Circumstances Instructional Assistance). It never hurts to request an additional assessment of your child. All results provide insight into your child’s abilities and highlights areas of concern. 

Be encouraged until the next time when I discuss the TTAP (TEACH Transition Assessment Profile). The TTAP is another assessment you are going to want your child to have. 

Where does the blame lie? Who is at fault?

Is it the teachers’ fault that they lack the training to meet the needs of students on the autism spectrum? Is it the districts’ fault that they were not more proactive about the multiple needs of their school’s personnel? Is it the fault of the Federal government and the looming education cuts? Does it really matter where the fault lies? Because the children with special needs, and their parents, are the ones feeling the stress. The parents are tired of receiving calls from their child’s school  to “come pick your child up due to behavior issues”. “He(/she) is causing a major disruption.” “I can’t do anything with him(/her).” 

So, the schools and teachers are not prepared to support the children and have made their lack of training the parents fault. Parents are not the school’s Plan B. 

In the past month, I have heard from many parents how teachers are calling them more and more to come pick up their children with autism due to behavior issues. Doesn’t the IEP explain what supports the child needs to be successful? Doesn’t the IEP state multiple approaches/strategies that have worked in the past? 

If the teacher implements the IEP as it is written, the child should have the appropriate amount of support to be succesful. HOWEVER, if the approaches do not work, then it is time to call an emergency IEP, NOT THE PARENTS TO COME PICK THE CHILD UP!

world-shaker:

This year.
(via xkcd: Resolution)

My 2013 WILL be BETTER and DIFFERENT! Watch and see! :)

world-shaker:

This year.

(via xkcd: Resolution)

My 2013 WILL be BETTER and DIFFERENT! Watch and see! :)

Welcome!

My blogs are going to focus on the current issues and trends in education affecting individuals with special needs. As the parent of a teenage son with autism, a former SPED/Inclusion teacher, and a doctoral candidate, I understand the frustration and challenges. I understand all of the frustration from the education side and the parent side. HOWEVER, there is a rainbow at the end. Allow me to help you navigate these challenges for the betterment of your child/student. Being successful is the only option!